Click to Home
Go To Search
Site Tools



Street and Road Alerts
Extended Weekend Closures of Long Beach Freeway (I-710) for Road Resurfacing and Bridge Widening Project

COMMERCE, VERNON- The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) announces extended weekend closures and the closures of on/off-ramps on Interstate 710 (I-710) for a road resurfacing and bridge widening project. Residents and local businesses located near the freeway may experience noise, vibrations and dust associated with construction activities. 

Beginning on Friday, November 15, there will be a full closure of northbound I-710 between Florence Ave and Interstate 5 (I-5) in the cities of Bell Gardens, Commerce and Vernon. Motorists will be restricted to two lanes of traffic on Saturday and Sunday when crews re-open the freeway.

Closures for Tuesday, November 12 through Thursday, November 14: 

Northbound I-710 (7 p.m. to 6 a.m.) 

Up to three lanes from Atlantic Blvd. to SR-60 will be closed 
Atlantic Blvd./Bandini Blvd. off-ramp 
Atlantic Blvd. on-ramp 
Washington Blvd. on and off-ramps 
Olympic Blvd. on and off-ramps 
Northbound I-710 to northbound I-5 connector (11 p.m. – 5 a.m.) 
Northbound I-5 to northbound I-710 Connector (11 p.m. – 5 a.m.) 

Southbound I-710 (7 p.m. to 6 a.m.) 

Up to three lanes from SR-60 to Atlantic Blvd. will be closed 
Southbound I-710 to southbound I-5 connector (11 p.m. – 5 a.m.) 
Southbound I-5 to southbound I-710 connector (11 p.m. – 5 a.m.) 
Third St. on and off-ramps 
Olympic/Whittier Blvd on and off-ramps 
Eastern Ave. on and off-ramps 
Washington Blvd. on and off-ramps 
Atlantic Blvd./Bandini Blvd. on and off-ramps  

55-hour Extended Weekend Closure Schedule: 

11:55 p.m. Friday, November 15 to 5 a.m. Saturday, November 16 

Full closure of northbound I-710 from Florence Ave to I-5 
Florence Ave on-ramp
Atlantic Blvd/Bandini Blvd on and off-ramps
Washington Blvd on and off-ramps

5 a.m. Saturday, November 16 to 11 p.m. Sunday, November 17 

Two lanes of northbound I-710 from Florence Ave to I-5 
Atlantic Blvd/Bandini Blvd on and off-ramps
Washington Blvd on and off-ramps

11 p.m. Sunday, November 17 to 5 a.m. Monday, November 18

Full closure of northbound I-710 from Florence Ave to I-5 
Florence Ave on-ramp
Atlantic Blvd/Bandini Blvd on and off-ramps
Washington Blvd on and off-ramps

Some closures may start and end later. All closures are weather permitting and subject to change. Motorists should expect delays and are strongly advised to use alternate routes. Drivers can check traffic conditions before they leave by visiting the Caltrans Quickmap. 

The work on I-710 is part of a $150.7 million pavement rehabilitation and bridge widening project that stretches 3.7 miles from Bell to East Los Angeles. 

Caltrans reminds drivers to be “Work Zone Alert” and to “Slow for the Cone Zone.” 

###




Traffic Signal Installation
Motorists are being advised that there will be traffic and congestion during the installation of a traffic signal on Washington Blvd. and the ARCO gas station entrance and Bank of the West entrance.

The project is expected to be completed in October and will help alleviate traffic in the area.

                       

Frequently Asked Questions – SLURRY SEAL

What is a slurry seal?

Slurry seal is an oil type application of asphalt emulsion, fine aggregate (sand) and water which will be placed on top of the existing pavement. The slurry is spread over the street existing asphalt surface at approximately 3/8” thick. The purpose of the slurry is to provide a new wearing surface and protect the asphalt underneath from water damage.

Why are there white discolored areas with sand?

This typically happens in situations of irrigation overspray or excess water in an area. The water discolors the slurry seal and brings out the cement and rock dust in the slurry mixture. Although the area may look different, the slurry seal performance will not be affected and will continue to do its job in protecting the underlying pavement from weather/moisture damage.

Why does the slurry seal appear uneven and rough?

The slurry seal is an emulsion of oil, sand, water, latex, and rock aggregates. The sand and rock aggregates give the slurry seal the texture necessary to provide vehicles with tire traction and improved safety, which is especially helpful during rain events.

 

Why does it look like there are seams in the slurry seal? Why isn’t it continuous all the way through?

Slurry seal is applied in passes and it typically takes several passes to slurry seal one street. In areas where passes connect, the slurry seal must be overlapped for the product to perform properly. The subject seams are the areas where the overlap is necessary.

Why can I see hairline cracks in the slurry?

Prior to slurry sealing, cracks larger than a quarter of an inch are sealed with crack sealant. Cracks smaller than a quarter-inch are sealed by the slurry seal. The slurry seal application does not provide a structure layer, as in an asphalt overlay; hence the visible propagation of existing cracks to the surface. Although some of the smaller cracks are still visible, the slurry seal performance will not be affected and will continue to do its job in protecting the underlying pavement from weather/moisture damage.

What is the process of the Slurry Seal project?

Application of slurry seal is a three step process. First, surface cracks are filled to help protect the subgrade from water infiltration. Second, for areas with greater pavement deterioration, the existing pavement is removed to a depth of 4”-6” and filled with new asphalt to provide for a stronger pavement section. Third, the slurry seal is applied over the asphalt roadway, thus completing the process. During all phases of work, driving and parking will be affected and we request that you adhere to all street postings.

Will this project affect street sweeping and trash pickup?

Street sweeping will be suspended during the slurry seal process to allow for the street to properly cure. Vehicles will not be cited on street sweeping days in the areas affected by the slurry seal project.

How come the Slurry Seal is a light brown color and not black?

When the slurry seal is applied, it is a light brown color due to the chemical reactions and the temperature of the mix. As the mix becomes exposed to heat and sunlight, it will begin to turn black.  Over time, as water reacts with the slurry seal, the street will begin to turn gray. Also, as cars drive on the street, the asphalt begins to wear off, exposing the gray aggregate underneath. This is natural and only affects the aesthetics of the street, not the structural integrity.

What precautions should I take once my street has been slurried?

Although a street may be opened to vehicular access after the slurry seal, it actually takes several months for the slurry to completely cure. Because of this, tire tracks and gouges may appear on the street. To avoid these tire tracks, we request that you minimize making sharp turns and turning your wheels while your car is stationary. The more visible tire tracks and “power steering” marks are often caused by heavy trucks, RVs, and trash trucks. During hot days and the summer months, these tire tracks may become more prevalent, but will eventually flatten out over time as the slurry cures. 

Frequently Asked Questions - OVERLAY 

What is an overlay?

Overlay is a process that removes the existing surface from a street and replaces it with the same thickness of asphalt. Asphalt overlays last approximately seven to ten years. It is a mixture of asphalt emulsion, fine aggregate (sand) and coarse aggregate (rocks). The purpose of the overlay is to provide a new wearing surface and protect the asphalt underneath from water damage.

Why does it look like there are seams in the pavement? Why isn’t it continuous all the way through?

Overlays are applied in passes and it typically takes several passes to complete one street. In areas where passes connect, the asphalt must be overlapped for the product to perform properly. The subject seams are the areas where the overlap is necessary.

What is the process of the Overlay project?

For areas with pavement deterioration, the existing pavement is removed to a depth of 2”-4” by grinding (cold-mill) and then paved with new asphalt (overlay) to provide for a stronger pavement section.

 

Will this project affect street sweeping and trash pickup?

Street sweeping will be suspended during the slurry seal process to allow for the street to properly cure. Vehicles will not be cited on street sweeping days in the areas affected by the slurry seal project.

What precautions should I take once my street has been paved?

Although a street may be opened to vehicular access after the paving process, it actually takes several months for the asphalt to completely cure. Because of this, we request that you minimize making sharp turns and turning your wheels while your car is stationary. Tire tracks and “power steering” marks are often caused by heavy trucks, RVs, and trash trucks. During hot days and the summer months, these tire tracks may become more prevalent, but will eventually flatten out over time as the asphalt cures.

 For questions, information and updates, please contact the Public Works Department, 323-887-4451.